RAL Awards and Patents

Honoring RAL's Outstanding Achievements
  • External Awards
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Recipient(s) AwardYear
Matthias SteinerAMS Fellow2014
Micah HahnExceptional Early-Career Contribution to the Field of EcoHealth2014
Daniel BreedThunderbird Award2014
Mahoney, Haupt, Kosovic, Wiener, Myers, Y. Liu, Johnson, Sun, Delle Monache, Politovich, Williams, Linden, Cheng, Pearson, Y. Liu, Wu, Adriaansen, P. Prestopnik, Brummet, Hopson, Dettling, Jensen, Roux, Exby, Dumont, Ruttenburg Colorado Governor's Award for High-Impact Research in the Sustainability category2014
Bruintjes, RoelofWMA Schaefer Award2013
Yates, DavidQuentin Martin Best2013
Cervone, GuidoISSNAF Young Investigator Award2013
Chen, FeiAMS Fellow2012
Bruintjes, RoelofWMA Thunderbird Award2012
Mahoney, WilliamAMS Fellow2011
Brown, BarbaraSpecial Recognition Award, WMO WWRP2011
Bieringer, PaulOutstanding Platform Presentation, National Chem/Bio Defense Science and Technology Conference2011
Foote, BrantAMS Cleveland Abbe Award 2010
Mahoney, WilliamAMS Kenneth C. Spengler Award 2010
Steiner, MatthiasBest Paper of Session Award, Digital Avionic Systems Conference 2010
Yates, DavidQuentin Martin Best Practices Paper, American Society of Civil Engineers2010
Theriault, JulieTertia M.C. Hughes Memorial Prize, Canadian Meteorological and Oceanic Society2010
Axisa, DuncanWMA Distinguished Service Award2010
Megenhardt, DanielU.S. Department of Commerce, NWS, Certificate of Recognition2009
Bruintjes, RoelofWMA International Award2009
Romero-Lankao PatyLeopold Leadership Fellowship 2008
Roberts, RitaAMS Fellow2008
Romero-Lankao PatyLatina Leader Award in the Category of Science, Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute 2008
Miller, KathleenNobel Peace Prize - IPCC, Nobel Foundation2008
Romero-Lankao PatyNobel Peace Prize - IPCC, Nobel Foundation2008
Johnson, DavidPaul F. Holloway Non-Aerospace Technology Transfer Award, NASA Langley2008
Politovich, MarciaPaul F. Holloway Non-Aerospace Technology Transfer Award, NASA Langley2008
Williams, JohnFirst place (tie), Artificial Intelligence Contest sponsored by Weather Decision Technologies, Inc., AMS Committee on Artificial Intelligence Applications to Environmental Science2008
Brown, BarbaraAMS Fellow2007
Thompson, Greg and Lindholm, Tenny A.ATCA Technical Writing Award2007
Haggerty, JulieNASA Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award2007
Wolff, Cory et al.NASA Earth Science Applications Award 2005
Cornman, LarryNASA Certificate of Appreciation, Aviation Safety and Security Program2005
Williams, JohnNASA Langley Certificate of Appreciation 2004
Breed, DanielDistinguished Alumni Award, Sterling Illinois, Schools Foundation 2004
Rasmussen, RoyAMS Fellow2004
Wilson, JamesAMS Remote Sensing Lecture Award 2003
Sharman, Robert and Cornman, LarryTop 50 Research Leaders of the Year, Scientific American2003
Turbulence Research TeamNASA "Turning Goals into Reality" 2003
Politovich, MarciaAMS Fellow2003
In-Flight Icing Research TeamNASA "Turning Goals into Reality"2002
Aviation Weather Research ProgramFAA "Excellence in Aviation Research" Award2002
Aviation Weather Research Program TeamNWA Aviation Weather Award2002
In-Flight Icing Research TeamNASA "Turning Goals into Reality"2001
Lindholm, Tenny A.Best Paper of Session Award, Digital Avionic Systems Conference 2001
Aviation Digital Data Service (ADDS)U.S. Government Technology Leadership Award Finalist2000
In-situ Turbulence Detection SystemAviation Week Laurels Award2000
Turbulence and windshear warning system, Hong Kong AirportAir Traffic Management Magazine award2000
Weather Support to Deicing Decision Making (WSDDM)U.S. Government Technology Leadership Award1999
Cornman, Larry et al.Aviation Week Laurels Award1998
Cornman, Larry and Wilson, WesAviation Week Laurels Award1990
Recipient(s) AwardYear
Sharman, Robert

Robert Sharman

Project Scientist 4 Appointment

2014
Wilhelmi, Olga et al.

Olga Wilhelmi, Jennifer Boehnert, and Kevin Sampson

NCAR Geographical Information System (GIS) Program

2014
Landolt, Scott

Scott Landolt

Creation and implementation of significant educational opportunities for high school students

2014
Rife, D.L. et al.2014
Demuth, Julie et al.

Julie Demuth (NCAR/RAL), Rebecca Morss (NCAR/MMM), Betty Hearn Morrow (SocResearch, Miami, FL), and Jeff Lazo (NCAR/RAL).

Demuth, J.L., R.E. Morss, B. Hearn Morrow, and J.K. Lazo, 2012: Creation and Communication of Hurricane Risk Information. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 93(8), 1133-1145.

This work represents an important effort to connect the forecast community that generates high-impact weather warnings, the emergency management community that uses these warnings to determine protective response actions, and the media who deliver the risk, warning, and response action information to the public to save lives and property. In doing so, this effort fully embraces an institutional imperative set forth in the new NCAR Strategic Plan: "Integrate the physical and social sciences to provide meaningful, useable information on the societal impacts of and vulnerabilities to climate change ...and improve the communication of risk and uncertainty to a diverse population." In their article, Demuth et al. outline the complex interactions among components of the United States hurricane warning system and elucidate the challenges in communicating risk through an effective partnership. This paper identifies concepts that researchers may have observed or thought of, and it ties those ideas together in a novel, coherent way of explaining the warning system. The study clearly reveals that collaboration across disciplinary boundaries, and between researchers and practitioners, is needed to understand and improve the translation and communication of weather threats into risk reduction actions.

2013
Laurie Carson et al.

Laurie Carson (RAL), Ming Hu (NOAA/ESRL), Xiang-Yu Huang (MMM), Louisa Nance (RAL), Kathryn Newman (RAL), Hui Shao (RAL), Don Stark (RAL), and Chunhua Zhou (RAL).

This team is responsible for establishing and maintaining the code management plan for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation (DA) system. GSI is a state-of-the-art DA system developed by numerous contributors throughout the U.S. It is currently the DA system used operationally within many of the weather forecasting systems run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). Given the distributed nature of the code development for GSI, as well as the need to ensure an effective transition from the research environment to the demands of 24x7 operations, NOAA and AFWA recognized the importance of rigorous code management for GSI. In 2009, they chose to work with staff at the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), jointly operated by NCAR/RAL and NOAA/ESRL, to develop, maintain and support a code management framework for GSI. Since 2010, the nominated GSI Code Management Team (GSI CMT) has provided that framework for DA development, creating and managing a code repository for members of the research and operational communities working to advance the science of DA. The GSI team has facilitated and supported the release of five versions of GSI, each providing the community with the latest GSI capabilities, as well as complete documentation and user support. Use of the GSI system has grown dramatically in the past five years and there are now more than 800 registered users in 60 countries. The code management team has played a critical role in this success.

2013
Steiner, Matthias et al.

Matthias Steiner (RAL/HAP), Richard Bateman (CU), Daniel Megenhardt (RAL/WSAP), Yubao Liu (RAL/NSAP), Matthew Pocernich (Neptune and Company, Inc.), Jimmy Krozel (Metron Aviation)

Steiner, M., R. Bateman, D. Megenhardt, Y. Liu, M. Xu, M. Pocernich, and J. Krozel, 2010: Translation of ensemble weather forecasts into probabilistic air traffic capacity impact. Air Traffic Control Quarterly, 18 (3), 229-254.

This article presents an elegant, highly innovative, and broadly influential conceptual framework for using probabilistic forecasting to characterize and manage the risk that weather poses to air traffic. The framework is demonstrated through a case study of a very disruptive and costly outbreak of thunderstorms in the northeastern United States. Beyond just this demonstration, the framework has the potential to transform how our society conceives, builds, uses, and evaluates weather-based decision-support technologies. Several letters of support highlight the framework's extensibility - NOAA's Robert Maxson calls it "the [probabilistic forecast] guidance of the future." Although published less than three years ago, the article has already advanced technology that is being used at NOAA's Aviation Weather Testbed. Experts in probabilistic forecasting and risk management describe the article as a "ground breaker" and "a well-written roadmap to both the scientific community and user community on where we as a nation should be headed in ensemble weather prediction research and operations." The article embodies the finest qualities of the work done in RAL: imaginative; cross-disciplinary; cross-organizational; and beneficial to communities of scientists, engineers, and end-users. It also epitomizes NCAR's overarching mission of science in service to society.

2012
Barron, Bob et al.

Bob Barron (RAL/AAP), Al Yates (RAL/AAP), Cory Morse (RAL/AAP), Deirdre Garvey (RAL/AO), Larry Cornman (RAL/AAP), Kent Goodrich (RAL/AAP), Steve Cohn (EOL/ISF), Marcia Politovich (RAL/AAP), Al Rodi (University of Wyoming), Paul Prestopnik (RAL/WSAP), Andrew Weekly (RAL/HAP), Gary Cunning (RAL/WSAP), Aaron Braeckel (RAL/AAP), Inger Barron (RAL, OA), Tor Mohling (RAL, AO), JEff Stolte (RAL/OA), Wes Wilson (RAL/AAP)

For Juneau Airport Winds System

Although Juneau is the capital of Alaska, the city is only accessible by air or sea. Safe, reliable air transportation is therefore critical but difficult to achieve given Juneau's location at the end of the Gastineau Channel with mountains on either side of the water. Severe turbulence induced by this complex terrain has led to a number of incidents and near-accidents at the airport and frequently resulted in the closure of runways when wind speeds were judged to be hazardous. In response to concerns for safety and the need for greater operational efficiency, the Federal Aviation Administration sought help from NCAR in 1996 to determine the feasibility of creating and implementing a wind hazard warning system. When early studies showed that significant improvements could be made, a full-scale research, development, and technology transfer program was initiated. Early efforts focused on understanding local meteorology as well as the specific nature of turbulence in the airport environment. Observational data were critical to this effort, and thus anemometers and wind profilers were acquired and deployed, and instrumented research aircraft were flown to collect data in three field programs. Field project data were used to develop algorithms to turn sensor data into real-time warnings that are provided to users in displays specifically designed to help them make decisions regarding safe flight. Following extensive evaluations by the FAA, the agency certified the Juneau Airport Winds System (JAWS) as a fully operational turbulence warning system in July 2012. This is the first FAA-approved terminal-area turbulence warning system to be deployed in the U.S.

2012
Knievel, Jason and Vandenberghe, Francois

Jason Knievel and Francois Vandenberghe

For the Commodity Jurisdiction Results for RTFDDA and CFDDA in 2011

This nomination for outstanding accomplishment, administrative achievement award is for the Research Applications Laboratory (RAL) team of Jason Knievel and Francois Vandenberghe, for their efforts in obtaining a ruling from the U.S. Department of State which allowed crucial RAL software to be freed from International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) restrictions. The outstanding efforts of these individuals have improved accessibility to important RAL software and saved RAL and UCAR significant time and expense in maintaining ITAR restricted software.

2012
Warner, Thomas T.

Thomas T. Warner (RAL, posthumous)

Warner, T. T., 2011: Numerical weather and climate prediction. Cambridge University Press, ISBN 978-0-521-51389-0, 526 pp.

This book provides an exceptionally well-written account of the practical and cutting-edge aspects of numerical predictions, with a particular emphasis on understanding model processes, as well as their limitations and how errors affect solutions. It includes clear descriptions of best practices, predictability, operational forecasting, and a wide range of special applications of numerical models not found in previous textbooks. This volume is a comprehensive reflection of the author's far-reaching experience gained through thirty years of teaching courses on numerical weather and climate prediction as well as mentoring a long line of graduate students and young professionals. Each chapter includes useful exercises and suggests further reading material. It is "a rich, effectively written and comprehensive detailed summary of the field of atmospheric modeling from local to global scales. It should be in the library of all meteorologists, climate researchers, and other scientists who are interested in the capabilities, strengths and weaknesses of modeling." This textbook has already reached Cambridge University Press' top-ten bestselling titles in Atmospheric Science and Meteorology, despite its very recent publication. The author has written a standout textbook that provides a comprehensive yet accessible treatment of weather and climate predictions, which will serve graduate students, researchers, and professionals alike.


Tom Warner's posthumous award was received by Scott Swerdlin (RAL) and Tom's wife, Susan Warner.

2011
Heymsfield, Andrew et al.

Andrew J. Heymsfield (NESL/MMM), Gregory Thompson (RAL/HAP), Hugh Morrison (NESL/MMM), Aaron Bansemer (NESL/MMM), Roy M. Rasmussen (RAL/HAP), Patrick Minnis (NASA Langley Research Center), Zhien Wang (University of Wyoming), and Damao Zhang (University of Wyoming)

Heymsfield, A.J., G. Thompson, H. Morrison, A. Bansemer, R. Rasmussen, P. Minnis, Z. Wang, and D. Zhang, 2011: Formation and spread of aircraft-induced holes in clouds. Science, 333, 77-81.

The nominated paper combines a multi-faceted approach to hypothesize and test the physical and dynamical basis of aircraft-induced cloud holes. The nominees show that the interactions of the microphysical processes of ice crystal growth in these clouds with the dynamics of the downdrafts around the center of the holes are responsible for their formation and growth over time. This paper is an excellent means of educating the public on basic cloud physics. The nominees utilized a unique combination of techniques to understand these hole-punch clouds, including satellite observations, aircraft track information, and detailed numerical modeling. They measured the rate of spread and persistence of the holes; they evaluated the exact aircraft that produced the holes and determined that inadvertent ice production occurs from private, commercial and military propeller, as well as jet aircraft; they also provided an explanation for how the ice production occurs for jet aircraft. In addition, using the WRF model, they numerically modeled the layer cloud case; they demonstrated that aircraft departing from a major airport inadvertently seeded a low-level subfreezing cloud, generating copious snow; and they quantified how frequently this inadvertent seeding is near five major commercial airports, requiring 20% more de-icing operations in midlatitude airport locations. The impact of this paper has been huge -- garnering attention from most major media outlets and via websites across the world.

2011
Mahoney, William et al.

William Mahoney, Gerry Wiener, Bill Myers, Yubao Liu, David Johnson, Seth Linden, Will Cheng, Brice Lambi, Arnaud Dumont, Julia Pearson, Luca Delle Monache, Gregory Roux, Branko Kosovic, John Exby, Yuewei Liu, Frank McDonough, Becky Ruttenburg , Doug Small, Tom Hopson, Wanli Wu , Alemu Tadesse, and Sue Ellen Haupt

For the NCAR/RAL Wind Power Forecasting System

The NCAR/RAL Wind Power Forecasting System enables utilities to integrate large amounts of wind energy into the power grid by providing comprehensive forecasts of wind power generation. Accurate forecasts are crucial for efficient energy planning and resource management as well as for advancing the role of wind energy as a major component of our national energy supply. The RAL team has collaborated with Xcel Energy over the past 2.5 years to develop an advanced wind power prediction system. Implementation of the system has resulted in a 40% reduction in wind energy prediction error, improving the integration of wind power into the electric grid and, in 2010 alone, saved Xcel Energy rate payers $6.0M. This wind energy forecasting system is widely considered - nationally and internationally - to be the most advanced system of its kind. A NOAA evaluation of the system's performance skill and associated cost savings conducted for the Utility Wind Integration Group concluded that a national rollout of NCAR's system would save the nation's utilities approximately $4.5B per year.

2011
Roberts, Rita and Wilson, James

Rita Roberts (RAL/HAP) and James Wilson (RAL/EOL)

For training weather forecasters to make better forecasts of convective weather using Autonowcaster.

Over the past five years, the nominees have taught students, scientists, and weather forecasters how to make better forecasts of convective weather. They do this with the Autonowcaster, a forecast decision system that incorporates much of their research and is now operational in selected U.S. National Weather Service, Army, and international forecast offices. They are nationally and internationally recognized for their expertise in short-term forecasting of thunderstorms and for their commitment to share their knowledge with others. They have taught at 15 international scientific workshops in partnership with the World Meteorological Organization and National Weather Service in the U.S. and abroad, conducted focused training programs, created interactive learning modules and other instructional materials, and hosted long-term visitors sent to NCAR for more intensive training. The impact of their work is profound. In giving the gift of information, knowledge, and skills, they have created new scientific capabilities for teachers and students, and for weather forecasters serving the general public.

2011
Wu, Qian et al.

Qian Wu (HAO), Cyndi Bradley (EOL/DFS), Greg Card (HAO), Vince Grow (EOL/DFS), Alice Lecinski (HAO), Chris Mahan (EOL/DFS), John Mickey (RAL/AAP), Pete Nelson (formerly HAO), Steve Palmer (EOL/DFS), Karl Schwenz (EOL/DFS), Scott Sewell (HAO), Jim Strieby (EOL/DFS), Rich Summers (HAO), Lee Sutherland (HAO), Andy Watt (EOL/RAF), and Bart Woodiel (EOL/DFS)

HAO Award/Walter O. Robert

The HiWind balloon mission produced unprecedented measurements of thermospheric winds that are not observable from the ground during the daytime. This innovative instrumentation, and its implementation on a balloon gondola platform, demonstrated that high-altitude balloon missions can fill a valuable role supplementing ground-based observational networks and expensive space missions that cost hundreds of millions of dollars more than comparable balloon missions. Engineers and scientists in the High Altitude Observatory and the Earth Observing Laboratory collaborated on a complex development effort, culminating in a science flight out of Esrange, near Kiruna, Sweden in June 2011, and recovered near Resolute Bay, Canada. The NCAR team that designed and built the instrument and gondola have enabled breakthrough observations of thermospheric winds and temperatures.

2011
Romero-Lankao, Paty et al.

Romero-Lankao Paty (RAL), Doug Nychka (CISL/IMAGe) and John Tribbia (formerly at ISSE)

Romero-Lankao, P., D. Nychka, and J. L. Tribbia, 2008: Development and greenhouse gas emissions deviate from the "modernization" theory and "convergence" hypothesis. Climate Research, 38, 17-29.

Paty Romero-Lankao (RAL), Doug Nychka (CISL/IMAGe) and John Tribbia (formerly at ISSE) for their paper, which contributes in pioneering ways to the heated debate about greenhouse gas emissions and how they are related to the development trajectories, status, and economic characteristics of countries worldwide. The paper also provides an innovative foundation for how to incorporate socio-economic aspects into the physical sciences' global carbon cycle discussion. This work will have a major and lasting impact on interdisciplinary sciences and environmental policy alike. "This article represents a courageous and successful attempt to deal with grand questions, while approaching them in a methodologically sound way."

2010
Brown, Barbara et al.

David Ahijevych (NESL/MMM), Barbara Brown (RAL/JNT), Randy Bullock (RAL/JNT), Chris Davis (NCAR/ASP), Tressa Fowler (RAL/JNT), Eric Gilleland (RAL/JNT), John Halley Gotway (RAL/JNT), Anne Holmes (RAL/JNT), Tara Jensen (RAL/JNT), and Paul Oldenburg (RAL/JNT)

For developing and supporting Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

MET is a highly-configurable, state-of-the-art suite of verification tools used in 92 countries by more than 1000 registered users. While MET was developed using output from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the tools are useful in evaluating forecasts from other modeling systems as well. MET facilitates efforts of researchers, operational meteorologists, and students to evaluate model forecasts, and it also encourages them on an ongoing basis. Creating new verification capabilities is an essential element of the MET effort.

2010
Dixon, Michael

Michael Dixon (RAL/HAP)

For his outstanding work teaching students, scientists, and weather forecasters how to utilize software he developed to better forecast precipitation events - the Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis and Nowcasting (TITAN) system.

This system is used in both research and operational communities in the U.S. and 25 other countries. Michael has created and refined a website that allows users to download and implement TITAN; he provides hands-on support to guide them in their use of the system; and he conducts workshops tailored to their specific weather forecasting needs. He also created a simple, step-by-step manual for TITAN users. He has established an International TITAN Users' Group as well. He travels frequently to provide hands-on consulting, training, and technical support for users around the world and hosts foreign visitors here at NCAR. Mike works closely with users to help them overcome issues of reformatting their own data to be used in TITAN to address weather conditions in their area. In 2009 he also helped organize and lead a TITAN training workshop in Belem, Brazil, which was attended by 80 people from South America, the U.S., Australia, South Africa, China, and Senegal. Mike's efforts have clearly had a major impact internationally in transferring nowcasting capabilities into operations.

2010
Davis, Chris et al.

Chris Davis (MMM/RAL), Barb Brown (RAL), and Randy Bullock (RAL)

Davis, C., B. Brown, and R. Bullock, 2006: Object-based Verification of Precipitation Forecasts. Part I: Methodology and Application to Mesoscale Rain Areas. Monthly Weather Review, 134, 1772-1784.

Chris Davis (MMM/RAL), Barb Brown (RAL), and Randy Bullock (RAL) for their pioneering paper on an object-based verification methodology which mimics the human perception of forecast quality and provides diagnostic feedback on the nature of forecast errors. This paper marks an important shift from traditional statistical scoring toward a diagnostically relevant verification approach that will change the way forecast performance assessments will be done in the future.

2009
Meymaris, Greg et al.

John Hubbert (EOL), Mike Dixon (RAL), Scott Ellis (EOL), and Greg Meymaris (RAL)

For the Real Time Ground Clutter Mitigation for Weather Radar.

Ground clutter contaminates true precipitation echoes, making it difficult to interpret radar data and, therefore, provide accurate forecasts. The nominees have developed a real-time, radar signal processing solution to this serious problem, a fuzzy logic algorithm entitled, Clutter Mitigation Decision (CMD). The CMD will help improve the understanding of the atmosphere, increase societal resilience to weather, and help provide world-class state-of-the-art radar data through this successful research-to-operations enhancement.

2009
Yates, David et al.

David Yates, Jack Sieber and Annette Huber-Lee (Stockholm Environment Institute), David Purkey (National Heritage Institute), and Hector Galbraith (Galbraith Environmental Services)

Yates, D., J. Sieber, D. Purkey, and A. Huber-Lee, 2005a: WEAP21 a demand, priority, and preference driven water planning model: Part 1, Model characteristics. Water International, 30(4), 487-500.

Yates, D., D. Purkey, H. Galbraith, A. Huber-Lee, and J. Sieber, 2005b: WEAP21 a demand, priority, and preference driven water planning model: Part 2, Aiding freshwater ecosystem service evaluation. Water International, 30(4), 501-512.

The authors describe the development and testing of a novel decision support system referred to as the WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning) model, which is considered one of the most novel environmental planning models ever developed. These papers show that the integration of hydrology and management is highly advantageous, as both supply and demand side interactions can be addressed simultaneously.

2008
Demuth, Julie et al.

Julie Demuth, Jeff Lazo and Olga Wilhelmi. Co-nominees included Eve Gruntfest (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs), Rebecca Morss (ESSL and SERE*), Sheldon Drobot (University of Colorado at Boulder), Mary Hayden (SERE*/ASP), and Matt Kelsch (UOP/COMET).

For Weather and Society * Integrated Studies (WAS*IS), a series of workshops, education and outreach activities, and community building efforts aimed at improving the integration of weather and social science.

More than 140 individuals from government, private, and nonprofit settings have taken part in WAS*IS, developing and sharing ideas and tools and producing a number of interdisciplinary papers and conference presentations.

2007
Roberts, Rita et al.

Rita Roberts. Co-nominee and co-author included Steven Rutledge (Colorado State University)

Roberts, R. D. and S. Rutledge, 2003: Nowcasting storm initiation and growth using GOES-8 and WSR-88D Data. Weather and Forecasting, 18, 562-584.

This paper outlines the incorporation of operational radar data into an automated nowcasting system for consistent and reliable improvement in short-term forecasts of thunderstorm behavior. The technique is now being incorporated in the production of National Weather Service warnings and in research at NOAA, NASA, and the Federal Aviation Administration.

2007
Hopson, Thomas et al.

Thomas Hopson (RAL and SERE*/ASP). Co-nominees include Hai-Ru Chang, Carlos Hoyos, Jun Jian, and Peter Webster (Georgia Institute of Technology); and Selvaraju Ramasamy and A.R. Subbiah (Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre).

For developing and implementing the Climate Forecasting Applications Program to provide operational flash flood forecasts for the country of Bangladesh.

In 2007 the system provided skillful forecasts and warnings of two extremely large flooding events, leading to the early evacuation of thousands of vulnerable citizens.

2007
Albo, Dave et al.

Dave Albo (WSAP), Ben Balsley, Kirk Clawson, Jeff Copeland (NSAP), Larry Cornman (AAP), Rod Frehlich (AAP), David Hahn (NSAP), Yubao Liu (NSAP), Niles Oien (WSAP), Michael Raines (NSAP), Bob Sharman (AAP), Rong Sheu, Scott Swerdlin (NSAP), Tom Warner (NSAP), and Stephen Dowdy (AO). Co-nominees included Jason Knievel (ESSL/MMM), Shane Mayor (EOL), Bruce Morley (EOL/RSF), Scott Spuler (EOL/RSF), Jenny Sun (ESSL/MMM), and Jeff Weil (CU/CIRES).

For designing, building, and implementing a building protection system for the Pentagon (Pentagon Shield).

This system detects hazardous substances released into the atmosphere and forecasts their transport and dispersion. The group made a number of significant scientific and technical advances in the process.

2006
Warner, Thomas T.

Thomas T. Warner (NSAP)

Warner, T, 2004: Desert Meteorology. Cambridge University Press, 595 pp.

2006
Gruntfest, Eve et al.

Eve Gruntfest, Julie Demuth, Sheldon Drobot, Mary Hayden, Olga Wilhelmi (all ISSE), and Jeff Lazo (WSAP). Co-nominees included Rebecca Morss (ESSL/MMM) and Matt Kelsch (UOP/COMET).

For Weather and Society * Integrated Studies (WAS*IS)

WAS*IS is an innovative series of workshops, education and outreach activities, and community building efforts aimed at improving the integration of weather and social science. Its goal is to empower practitioners, researchers, and stakeholders in all sectors of the weather enterprise to forge new relationships and to develop and use new tools for more effective socio-economic applications and evaluations of weather products.

2006
Coen, Janice

Janice Coen (RAL and MMM). Co-nominees and co-authors included Shankar Mahalingam (University of California, Riverside) and John Daily (University of Colorado, Boulder).

Coen, J., S. Mahalingam, and J. Daily, 2004: Infrared Imagery of Crown-Fire Dynamics during FROSTFIRE. Journal of Applied Meteorology , 43, 1241-1259.

This paper represents an important contribution to our knowledge of wildfire dynamics and the coupling of fires with the surrounding atmosphere, and it presents fundamentally new observations that will change the focus and direction of future theoretical and modeling studies.

2005
Wilson, James

James Wilson (RAL/EOL)

For providing meaningful mentorship to a broad range of people from junior and senior scientists, administrators, and engineers to various levels of students.

Jim transcends cultural, gender, job classification, divisional, institutional, and national boundaries to identify and encourage the special talents of others.


Winners of the UCAR Outstanding Accomplishment Awards for 2004. Front row (left to right): Chin-Hoh Moeng, Sonja Stevenson, Lucy Warner, Jim Wilson, Anatta, Nita Razo, Carlye Calvin. Second row: Nicole Gordon, Mike Shibao, Jeff Weil, Tom Horst, Peter Sullivan. Third row: David Hosansky, Bob Henson, Yvonne Mondragon, Zhenya Gallon, John Michelakes. Back row: Katy Schmoll, Tim Killeen, Rick Anthes.

2004
Sharman, Bob et al.

Bob Sharman (AAP/RAL). Co-nominees and co-authors included Todd Lane (ASP/CMS), Terry Clark (MMM/CSM), and Hsiao-Ming Hsu (MMM)

Lane, T. P., R. D. Sharman, T. L. Clark, and H.-M. Hsu, 2003: An investigation of turbulence generation mechanisms above deep convection.Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 60 (10), 1297-1321.

The article addresses two fundamental issues in atmospheric science that can affect aviation: the processes underlying the generation of gravity waves by cumulus convection (which can induce strong turbulence close to the tops of clouds), and the effect of lower-stratospheric gravity wave breaking on mixing and stratosphere-troposphere exchange. The work that builds on this research will help the Federal Aviation Administration develop new safety guidelines for specifying the distance between aircraft and the tops of convective clouds.

2004
Mahoney, et al.

Bill Mahoney, Bill Myers, Ben Bernstein, Jim Cowie, Jamie Wolff, Jaimi Yee, Seth Linden, Arnaud Dumont, and Paddy McCarthy

For the development of the road weather Maintenance Decision Support System.

This decision support tool, which aims to improve the safety and efficiency of winter road maintenance operations, provides transportation managers with recommendations on road maintenance, as well as anticipated consequences of action or inaction.

2004
Zhang, et al.

Guifu Zhang, Ed Brandes, and J. Vivekanandan (RAP)

Zhang, G., J. Vivekaandan, and E. Brandes, 2001, "A Method for Estimating Rain Rate and Drop Size Distribution from Polarimetric Radar Measurements," IEEE Transactions of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 39:4, 830-841.

Brandes, E., G. Zhang, and J. Vivekanandan, 2003, "An Evaluation of a Drop Distribution-Based Polarimetric Radar Rainfall Estimator," J. Applied Met., 42, 652-660.

These papers describe a new technique for retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from dual-polarization radar measurements. The knowledge gained about cloud microphysical properties will allow development of improved parameterizations in operational and research weather prediction and climate models. Basic knowledge of cloud microphysical properties will also be enhanced, and it will be possible to better calculate the propagation characteristics of microwaves.

2003
Mahoney, William et al.

William Mahoney, Mike Dixon, Deirdre Garvey, Frank Hage, Celia Chen, David Johnson, Niles Oien, Susan Dettling, and Carol Park (all with RAP). Co-winners included Jordan Powers, Jim Bresch, Dale Barker, and Al Bourgeois (all MMM), and Bill Kuo (COSMIC/MMM).

For the Advanced Operational Aviation Weather System.

The team designed, developed, and implemented the Advanced Operational Aviation Weather System, thereby providing a critical boost to Taiwan's aviation weather capabilities.

2002
Cornman, Larry et al.2002
Sun, Juanzhen "Jenny" and Crook, N. Andrew

Juanzhen "Jenny" Sun and N. Andrew Crook (both joint MMM and RAL)

Sun, J. and N. A. Crook, 1997: Dynamical and microphysical retrieval from Doppler radar observations using a cloud model and its adjoint. Part I: Model development and simulated data experiments. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 54 (12), 1642-1661.

Sun, J. and N. A. Crook, 1998: Dynamical and microphysical retrieval from Doppler radar observations using a cloud model and its adjoint. Part II: Retrieval experiments of an observed Florida convective storm. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 55 (5), 835-852.

Sun, J. and N. A. Crook, 2001: Real-time low- level wind and temperature analysis using single WSR-88D data. Weather and Forecasting, 16 (1), 117-132.

The papers make an important contribution to atmospheric science by presenting a new method for improving 0-12 hour forecasts and, in so doing, advancing the scientific understanding of convection. They also break new ground in assimilating Doppler radar data into a cloud-scale model, providing the potential for significantly improving initial conditions in the model.


Andrew Crook (second from left) and Jenny Sun (center), both joint MMM/RAP, won the Outstanding Publication Award.

2001
Swerdlin, Scott et al.

Scott Swerdlin, Tom Warner, Cindy Mueller, Laurie Carson, Yubao Liu, Doug Lindholm, Rebecca Ruttenberg, Tom Saxen, Hank Fisher, Daran Rife, Troy Sandblom, Julien Chastang, David Hahn, Hsiao-Ming Hsu, Rong-Shyang Sheu, Steve Webb, David Leberknight, Fei Chen, Niles Oien, Jaimi Yee, Terri Betancourt, Carter Borst, and Chris Davis (RAL and ESSL/MMM)

For their work in designing, developing, and implementing a Four-Dimensional Weather (4DWX) system for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command.

The U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command is the command's primary source of weather data, forecasts, and analyses. Significant advances in both science and engineering have been made in the course of developing the system at five army ranges. They include advances in real-time, four-dimensional data assimilation techniques; providing improved short-term forecasting capabilities; and the creation of Java-based software to manage data ingest, quality control, requests for information, system monitoring, and weather alerts. Co-nominees included Simon Low-Nam, Al Bourgeois, and Kevin Manning (ESSL/MMM).


A RAP/MMM team won the Scientific and Technical Advancement Award.

2001
Politovich, Marcia and Bernstein, Ben

Marcia Politovich and Ben Bernstein

For their years of work with forecasters, pilots, and dispatchers in the area of inflight icing.

Their work included listening to the needs of the user community, demonstrating new products and capabilities, and educating users about relevant meteorological principles.

2001
Rasmussen, Roy et al.

Roy Rasmussen, Jothiram Vivekanandan, and Jeff Cole. Co-authors included: M. Kuperman (United Airlines, San Francisco, CA), Barry Myers (Transport Canada, Montreal, Quebec), and Charles Masters (FAA, Atlantic City, NJ).

Rasmussen, R., J. Cole, R. K. Moore, and M. Kuperman, 2000: Common snowfall conditions associated with aircraft takeoff accidents. Journal of Aircraft, 37 (1), 110-116.

Rasmussen, R.M., J. Vivekanandan, J. Cole, B. Myers, and C. Masters, 1999: The estimation of snowfall rate using visibility. Journal of Applied Meteorology, 38 (10), 1542-1563.

A combination of five years of fundamental research and practical application went into these papers, which analyze a series of aircraft accidents that involved inadequate deicing. The authors found that the standard relationship between snowfall intensity and visibility that is used by many weather services can be misleading because of variations in snow type and differences in how visibility is affected by snowfall during the day versus the night. Because of this work, airlines have improved the procedures they use to estimate snowfall rates.


Roy Rasmussen (second from left), one of three recipients of the Outstanding Publication award, is joined by (left to right) Tim Killeen, Jack Fellows, Katy Schmoll, and Rick Anthes. Not pictured are Jothiram Vivekenandan and Jeff Cole.

2000
Neilley, Peter et al.

Peter Neilley, Bill Myers, Missy Petty, Gerry Wiener, Greg Thompson, Shel Dalton, and Greg Young

For development of the Dynamic, Integrated Forecast (DICast) system.

DICast provides automated weather forecasts for a broad variety of applications around the world. Through a number of commercial vendors across the Internet, DICast satisfies an estimated 50 million forecast requests each day. The system integrates a variety of forecast tools, including National Weather Service statistical output, to provide site- and time-specific forecasts of exceptional accuracy.

2000
Thompsan, Greg et al.

Greg Thompson, Paddy McCarthy, Frank Hage, and Shelly Knight

For the development of the Aviation Digital Data Service (ADDS).

ADDS is a Web-based information service that makes sophisticated aviation weather products and associated flight-planning tools available to any on-line user. Through several modest grants, the system grew out of an ad-hoc Web site devoted to aviation weather. ADDS is now being used by major airlines, corporations, the armed services, and private aviators. The manager of meteorology for United Airlines said he could "not recall a more significant advance in the production and delivery of essential aviation products than ADDS."


Flanked by Bob Serafin (left) and Rick Anthes and Jack Fellows (right) are four award-winning RAP staff: Paddy McCarthy, Greg Thompson, Shelly Knight, and Frank Hage.

1999
Wilson, James and Megenhardt, Daniel

James Wilson and Daniel Megenhardt

J. Wilson and D. Megenhardt, 1997: Thunderstorm initiation, organization, and lifetime associated with Florida boundary layer convergence lines. Monthly Weather Review, 125 (7), 1508-25.

Using 32 days of data from the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) field project in Florida, this paper shows how the area's longer-lived multicellular storms - those more likely to cause serious damage - are sustained. Analysis shows that the formation and duration of these storms is related to the vertical wind shear and storm motion relative to two recurring boundaries, the East Coast Sea Breeze Front and the West Coast Front. By calculating the boundary-relative cell motion, forecasters can use these findings to improve storm forecasts, including those issued by automated systems. This represents a fundamental advance in short-term storm forecasting, with the findings already being applied in New Mexico, Alabama, Virginia, and Australia.

1999
Petty, Kevin et al.

Kevin Petty (ASP and RAL). Co-winners included Charlie Knight (ESSL/MMM) and Raj Pandya (ASP and ESSL/MMM).

For significant contributions toward bringing current knowledge on weather and climate to teachers throughout Colorado via NCAR's Project LEARN (Laboratory Experience in Atmospheric Research at NCAR).


Winners of the 1998 Performance Awards: (left to right) John Clyne, NCAR director Bob Serafin, Jeff Boote, UCAR president Rick Anthes, Don Lenschow, Krista Laursen, Kevin Petty, Hal Cole, Chip Owens, Rich Lueb, Errol Korn, Terry Hock, UCAR vice president Jack Fellows, Charlie Knight, Ned Chamberlain, Dean Lauritsen, (clockwise from top) Ken Norris, Phil Judge, Cindy Worster, and Eron Brennan.

1998
Ames, Rachel et al.

Rachel Ames, Jeff Cole, Frank Hage, Tres Hofmeister, Nancy Rehak, and Ren Tescher (RAL)

For developing, deploying, and demonstrating the Weather Support to Deicing Decision Making (WSDDM) system at La Guardia and O'Hare International Airports.

WSDDM is an integrated system that depicts short-term forecasts of snowfall rate, wind speed and direction, temperature, and humidity, all in an easy-to-interpret format. Last winter, this FAA-supported system was tested by four airlines at the two airports above, as well as by the New York Traffic Control Center at LaGuardia. One of the system's greatest strengths is its use of snow-gauge data to determine liquid equivalent snowfall rates - the most important factor that determines how often aircraft must be deiced. One study estimated that the annual cost savings to an airport using WSDDM would be more than $1 million. To support the many data sources and widely dispersed users, the WSDDM team created the largest, most complex networking system in RAP's history.

1997
Rasmussen, Roy et al.

Roy Rasmussen, Ben Bernstein, and Greg Stossmeister. Co-nominees and co-authors included Masataka Murakami (Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan), Jon Reisner (Los Alamos National Laboratory) and Boba Stankov (NOAA).

Rasmussen, R. M., B. C. Bernstein, M. Murakami, G. Stossmeister, J. Reisner and B. Stankov, 1995: The 1990 Valentine's Day Arctic outbreak, Part I: Mesoscale and microscale structure and evolution of a Colorado Front Range shallow upslope cloud. Journal of Applied Meteorology 34 (7), 1481-1511.

Shallow upslope storms, which develop along the Front Range two to six times per year and last from three to four days each, are of great interest to atmospheric scientists as well as to pilots. The storms' relatively warm cloud tops allow droplets to remain unfrozen for long periods, posing a significant aviation hazard. This study examines a 1990 storm in detail, showing the dynamical and microphysical mechanisms that led to long-lived regions of supercooled liquid water and freezing drizzle aloft. These mechanisms include upper-level jet streaks, which can help suppress vertical development of the precipitation, and sequential surges of cold air, which at first hasten but eventually diminish the production of supercooled liquid water. Insights from this and later work have led to improved pilot training, better algorithms of in-flight icing, and improved paramaterization of supercooled liquid water in mesoscale models.

1997
Cornman, Larry et al.

Larry Cornman, Gary Cunning, and Corinne Morse (RAL)

Cornman, L., C. Morse, and G. Cunning, 1995: Real-time estimation of atmospheric turbulence severity from in-situ aircraft measurements. Journal of Aircraft, 32 (1), 171-177.

This paper presents a new concept for automated, quantitative measurements of atmospheric turbulence: the use of commercial aircraft as turbulence-sensing platforms whose data can be assembled and processed in real time at a ground site. The vertical accelerations of an aircraft, routinely measured in flight, can be used to infer the turbulent forces producing up-and-down motions. By adopting simplifications to this highly complex mathematical and physical problem, the authors produced an algorithm that can be easily implemented on any aircraft. The technique is being deployed on over 200 United Airlines aircraft in the next few months. Along with its potential for real-time detection and warning, the algorithm also promises to give scientists a wealth of data for research on the structure of atmospheric turbulence.

1997
Cole, Jeff

Jeff Cole (RAP)

For developing and supporting RAP's Snowfall Test Site at Marshall.

Nearly single-handedly, Jeff set up a facility for testing snow gauges and evaluating the performance of deicing fluids for RAP's FAA-sponsored Ground Deicing and Snowfall Evaluation Program. Over the past three years Jeff has created a state-of-the-art test site with a wide variety of weather and snowfall sensors. He also has modified a trailer to serve as an operations center with real-time radar displays and output from the various sensors. The Marshall site has become an important component of RAP's winter research program and has attracted national and international attention.

1996
Wilson, James et al.

James Wilson, Brant Foote, Andrew Crooke, James Fankhauser, Charles Wade, John Tuttle, Cynthia Mueller, and Steven Krueger (RAP)

Wilson, J.W., G. B. Foote, N. A. Crook, J. C. Fankhauser, C. G. Wade, J. D. Tuttle, C. K. Mueller, and S. K. Krueger,1992: The role of boundary-layer convergence zones and horizontal rolls in the initiation of thunderstorms: A case study. Monthly Weather Review, 129 (), 1785-1815.

This paper combines observations from Doppler radars, aircraft, atmospheric soundings, and a mesonetwork with cloud photographs and numerical simulations to describe how various scales of meteorological phenomena interact to produce thunderstorms. The findings are important for the short-term forecasting of thunderstorm activity. Other researchers have since applied these results to the formation of thunderstorms at the intersections of sea-breeze fronts and boundary-layer rolls.

1995
Vivekanandan, Jothiram et al.

Jothiram Vivekanandan (Research Applications Program), Joseph Turk (Colorado State University), and V. N. Bringi (CSU)

"Comparisons of precipitation measurements by the advanced microwave precipitation radiometer [AMPR] and multiparameter radar," IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 31 (1993), 860-870.

The problem of measuring precipitation from space is examined through use of NASA's AMPR instrument and NCAR's CP-2 multiparameter radar during the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment in central Florida. Vast regions of the globe have inadequate ground-based measurements of precipitation. The CP-2 data are used in this paper to infer particle size, shape, and composition within convection; these variables are then compared to radiometer-derived brightness temperature. This, the first paper to show AMPR's potential to study microphysics within convective storms, is a pioneering effort toward classifying and measuring global precipitation using satellite-based instruments.

1994
Henson, Deborah et al.

Deborah Henson, Patty Hill, Cheryl Jones, Carol Makowski, and Carol Park-Hill, all of the Research Applications Program (RAP)

For their compilation and production of materials for the first two NCAR Aviation Weather Program reviews given for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The team showed initiative, creativity, dedication, and expertise under severe time constraints, producing two highly professional and comprehensive review packages.

1992
Katz, Richard and Brown, Barbara

Richard Katz and Barbara Brown

"Extreme Events in a Changing Climate: Variability Is More Important than Averages, "Climatic Change 21, 289-302.

This paper summarizes research conducted as part of a three-year project on extreme events and climate change, demonstrating how thes tatistical theory of extremes can be exploited in climate applications.

1992
Barron, Bob et al.

Bob Barron, Bill Myers, John Caron, and Frank Hage, all of RAP

For the development of two outstanding weather displays as part of the FAA Aviation Weather Development Program.

The regional display converts a large amount of data into three-dimensional displays and represents a quantum leap in temporal and spatial depiction of aviation weather. The three-dimensional terminal viewer combines weather products, satellite terrain imagery, and air traffic into a pioneering virtual-reality display that runs in real time.

1992
Crook, Andrew1991
Crook, Andrew1990
Wilson, James et al.

James Wilson (ATD) and Roger Wakimoto (University of California, Los Angeles)

Wakimoto, R.M., and J.W. Wilson, 1989: Non-supercell tornadoes. Monthly Weather Review, 117, 1113-1140.

1989
Barron, Bob et al.

Bob Barron, Cleon Biter, Dave Albo, Gerry Wiener, Jon Lutz, Kristi Brislawn

For developing a display system for the terminal Doppler weather radar

1988
Elmore, Kim et al.

Kim Elmore, Cathy Kessinger, Cynthia Mueller, Phyllis O'Rourke, and Rita Roberts (FOF)

For their contribution to aviation meteorology and aviation safety through the Joint Airport Weather Studies project.

1983

About UCAR Awards

Outstanding Publication
Nominees for this honor have published either results of original work or other contributions, such as books or review papers, that have increased understanding of atmospheric science.

Technology Advancement
This award honors major individual or group creations of the past year that represent technical achievements in engineering, computer science, or applied science.

Technical Support
This honor recognizes a team or individual for a single superior performance or a history of noteworthy effort in such areas as exceptional instrument maintenance or instrument fabrication.

Administrative Support
This award honors an individual or group for a single outstanding performance or a long history of support beyond the call of duty in such areas as improving a management practice or skillfully handling an operational effort.

Education
This new award honors the most significant individual or group achievement in postgraduate, graduate, undergraduate, K-12, or general public science education, including such areas as development of programs or curricular materials in science, mathematics, and technology transfer.

Patents

UCAR Inventor(s) Patent TitlePatent No.Issue Date
Albo, Eugene David Enhanced Microburst Detection System59736351999-10-26
Albo, Eugene David Microburst Detection System - Formerly Known as Fuzzy Logic56487821997-07-15
Barron, Bob Best in Time Forecasting System62983072001-10-02
Beagley, Nathaniel Multi-stage processing for efficient and accurate spectral moment estimation65772652003-06-10
Bieringer, Paul E.Weather Radar Echo Tops Forecast Generation7,391,3582008-06-24
Bieringer, Paul E.Atmospheric Feature Detection Using Lagrangian Scalar Integration7,472,0212008-12-30
Cole, Jeff A. Frozen Precipitation Accumulation Alert System58506191998-12-15
Cornman, Lawrence B. Feature Classification for Time Series Data67355502004-05-11
Cornman, Lawrence B.Multi-stage processing for efficient and accurate spectral moment estimation65772652003-06-10
Cornman, Lawrence B. Method of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)6,307,500 B12001-10-23
Cornman, Lawrence B. Method Of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)59405231999-08-14
Cornman, Lawrence B. Low-Level Wind-Shear Alert System (Improved Shape Generation)53510451994-09-27
Cornman, Lawrence B. Low-Level Wind-Shear Alert System (Microburst Shape Generation)53152971994-05-24
Cornman, Lawrence B. Improved Low-Level Wind-Shear Alert System (LLWAS & TDWR Integration52570211993-10-26
Cornman, Lawrence B. Low-level Wind Shear Alerty System (Gust Front Detection)52085871993-05-04
Dalton, Shelly D. Multi-stage processing for efficient and accurate spectral moment estimation65772652003-06-10
Goodrich, Robert K.Multi-stage processing for efficient and accurate spectral moment estimation65772652003-06-10
Goodrich, Robert Kent Feature Classification for Time Series Data67355502004-05-11
Goodrich, Robert Kent Method of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)6,307,500 B12001-10-23
Goodrich, Robert Kent Method Of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)59405231999-08-14
Goodrich, Robert Kent Microburst Detection System - Formerly Known as Fuzzy Logic56487821997-07-15
Hage, Frank W.Precipitation measurement device7,340,949 B12008-03-11
Hage, Frank W.De-icing information system7,369,053 B22008-05-06
Hage, Frank W. Frozen Precipitation Accumulation Alert System58506191998-12-15
Johnson, DavidOptical device for correcting geostationary satellite imagery for earth curvature effects76761122010-03-09
Meymaris, GregoryMethod and apparatus for clutter filtering staggered pulse repetition time signals7,728,765 B12010-06-01
Moore, Wayne Best in Time Forecasting System62983072001-10-02
Morse, Corrine Method of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)6,307,500 B12001-10-23
Morse, Corrine Method Of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)59405231999-08-14
Myers, William L. System For Determination of Optimal Travel Path in a Multidimensional Space60851472000-07-04
Myers, William L. Virtual Reality Imaging System with Image Replay57512891998-05-12
Myers, William L. Virtual Reality Imaging System54902391996-02-06
Praskovskaya, Eleanor A. System for Measuring Characteristic of Scatterers Using Spaced Receiver Remote Sensors (STARS)65129962003-01-28
Praskovsky, Alexander A. System for Measuring Characteristic of Scatterers Using Spaced Receiver Remote Sensors (STARS)65129962003-01-28
Rasmussen, Roy M.De-icing information system7,369,053 B22008-05-06
Rasmussen, Roy M. De-icing information system 7,129,846 B2 2006-10-31
Rasmussen, Roy M. Sensor system to distinguish frozen and non-frozen liquid particulates7,191,643 B2 2007-03-20
Rasmussen, Roy M. Hotplate Precipitation Measuring System67515712004-06-15
Rasmussen, Roy M. Hotplate Measuring System6,714,869 B12004-03-30
Rasmussen, Roy M. Hotplate Measuring System6,711,521 B12004-03-23
Rasmussen, Roy M. Hotplate Measuring System6,708,133 B12004-03-16
Rasmussen, Roy M. Hotplate Measuring System6,675,100 B12004-01-06
Rasmussen, Roy M. Hotplate Precipitation Measuring System6,546,353 B12003-04-08
Rasmussen, Roy M. Frozen Precipitation Accumulation Alert System58506191998-12-15
Rasmussen, Roy M. Winter Precipitation Measuring System57447111998-04-28
Sand, Wayne R. Icing Hazard Detection for Aircraft50289291991-07-02
Vivekananadan, Jothiram Determining 3-Dimensional Velocity of an Object6,721,678 B12004-04-13
Vivekananadan, Jothiram Determining Temperature of a Physical Medium Using Remote Measurement65369482003-03-25
Vivekananadan, Jothiram Ice Detection Radiometers57774811998-07-07
Wade, Charles G. Frozen Precipitation Accumulation Alert System58506191998-12-15
Weekley, Andrew Feature Classification for Time Series Data67355502004-05-11
Wilson, Jim Method for Determining Storm Predictability63409462002-01-22
Wilson, Jr., F. Wesley Wind Shear Alert System (LLWAS)52219241993-06-22
Zhang, Guifu Determining 3-Dimensional Velocity of an Object6,721,678 B12004-04-13
Zhang, Guifu Determining Temperature of a Physical Medium Using Remote Measurement65369482003-03-25

Award Recipients

2011 - Outstanding Publication


Tom Warner's posthumous award was received by Scott Swerdlin (RAL) and Tom's wife, Susan Warner.

2011 - Scientific and Technical Advancement


William Mahoney, Gerry Wiener, Bill Myers, Yubao Liu, David Johnson, Seth Linden, Will Cheng, Brice Lambi, Arnaud Dumont, Julia Pearson, Luca Delle Monache, Gregory Roux, Branko Kosovic, John Exby, Yuewei Liu, Frank McDonough, Becky Ruttenburg , Doug Small, Tom Hopson, Wanli Wu , Alemu Tadesse, and Sue Ellen Haupt

2011 - Education and Outreach


Rita Roberts (RAL/HAP) and James Wilson (RAL/EOL)

2009 - Scientific and Technical Advancement


John Hubbert (EOL), Mike Dixon (RAL), Scott Ellis (EOL), and Greg Meymaris (RAL)

2004 - Mentoring


Winners of the UCAR Outstanding Accomplishment Awards for 2004. Front row (left to right): Chin-Hoh Moeng, Sonja Stevenson, Lucy Warner, Jim Wilson, Anatta, Nita Razo, Carlye Calvin. Second row: Nicole Gordon, Mike Shibao, Jeff Weil, Tom Horst, Peter Sullivan. Third row: David Hosansky, Bob Henson, Yvonne Mondragon, Zhenya Gallon, John Michelakes. Back row: Katy Schmoll, Tim Killeen, Rick Anthes.

2002 - Scientific and Technical Accomplishment


William Mahoney, Mike Dixon, Deirdre Garvey, Frank Hage, Celia Chen, David Johnson, Niles Oien, Susan Dettling, and Carol Park (all with RAP). Co-winners included Jordan Powers, Jim Bresch, Dale Barker, and Al Bourgeois (all MMM), and Bill Kuo (COSMIC/MMM).

2001 - Outstanding Publication


Andrew Crook (second from left) and Jenny Sun (center), both joint MMM/RAP, won the Outstanding Publication Award.

2001 - Scientific and Technical Accomplishment


A RAP/MMM team won the Scientific and Technical Advancement Award.

2000 - Outstanding Publication


Roy Rasmussen (second from left), one of three recipients of the Outstanding Publication award, is joined by (left to right) Tim Killeen, Jack Fellows, Katy Schmoll, and Rick Anthes. Not pictured are Jothiram Vivekenandan and Jeff Cole.

1999 - Scientific and Technical Advancement


Flanked by Bob Serafin (left) and Rick Anthes and Jack Fellows (right) are four award-winning RAP staff: Paddy McCarthy, Greg Thompson, Shelly Knight, and Frank Hage.

1998 - Education


Winners of the 1998 Performance Awards: (left to right) John Clyne, NCAR director Bob Serafin, Jeff Boote, UCAR president Rick Anthes, Don Lenschow, Krista Laursen, Kevin Petty, Hal Cole, Chip Owens, Rich Lueb, Errol Korn, Terry Hock, UCAR vice president Jack Fellows, Charlie Knight, Ned Chamberlain, Dean Lauritsen, (clockwise from top) Ken Norris, Phil Judge, Cindy Worster, and Eron Brennan.


Patent Recipients

2010 - Method and apparatus for clutter filtering staggered pulse repetition time signals


Gregory Meymaris

2010 - Optical device for correcting geostationary satellite imagery for earth curvature effects


David Johnson

2007 - Sensor system to distinguish frozen and non-frozen liquid particulates


Roy Rasmussen

2004 - Feature Classification for Time Series Data


Larry Cornman, Kent Goodrich and Andrew Weekley accept their patent awards from Rick Anthes, UCAR President.

2004 - Determining 3-Dimensional Velocity of an Object


Jothiram Vivekanandan (RAL) accepts his patent award from Rick Anthes, UCAR President.

2004 - Determining 3-Dimensional Velocity of an Object


Guifu Zhang and Jothiram Vivekanandan (RAP) accept their patent award from Rick Anthes, UCAR President.

2004 - Hotplate Measuring System


Roy Rassmussen (RAP ) accepts his patent award from Rick Anthes, UCAR President.

2003 - Multi-stage processing for efficient and accurate spectral moment estimation


Rick Anthes, UCAR President, presents a patent award to Shelly Dalton, Larry Cornman, and Robert Goodrich (RAP).

2003 - System for Measuring Characteristic of Scatterers Using Spaced Receiver Remote Sensors (STARS)


Alexander Praskovsky and Eleanor Praskovskaya (RAP) accept their patent award from Rick Anthes, UCAR President.

2001 - Method of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)


Back: Jack Fellows, Mitch Randall, Stick Ware, Rick Anthes Middle: Teresa Van Hove, Jim Johnson, Larry Corman Front: John Braun, Cory Morse, Wayne Moore

1999 - Method Of Moment Estimation and Feature For Devices Which Measure Spectra As a Function of Range or Time (NIMA)


UCAR's patent holders for 2000: (left to right) Dave Albo, Bill Myers, Chris Rocken, Larry Cornman, Kent Goodrich, Fred Solheim, Chris Alber, Cory Morse, and Stick Ware.

1998 - Frozen Precipitation Accumulation Alert System


The RAP staff honored at the 1999 Inventor Recognition Luncheon: (standing, left to right) Chuck Wade, Frank Hage, Jothiram Vivekanandan, and Roy Rasmussen; (seated) Bill Myers and Larry Cornman. (Photo by Carlye Calvin.)

1998 - Winter Precipitation Measuring System


The RAP staff honored at the 1999 Inventor Recognition Luncheon: (standing, left to right) Chuck Wade, Frank Hage, Jothiram Vivekanandan, and Roy Rasmussen; (seated) Bill Myers and Larry Cornman. (Photo by Carlye Calvin.)

1997 - Microburst Detection System - Formerly Known as Fuzzy Logic


Left to right are Kent Goodrich, Fred Solheim, Dave Albo, Chris Rocken, Stick Ware, Sig Stenlund, Dean Lauritsen, and Paul Swarztrauber. (photo May 1998)

1996 - Virtual Reality Imaging System


Bill Myers (far left) was honored for his patent at a congratulatory luncheon sponsored by UCAR's Intellectual Property Management Program (photo January 1997).